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2 edition of Can risk aversion explain the demands for dividends? found in the catalog.

Can risk aversion explain the demands for dividends?

Lee S. Redding

Can risk aversion explain the demands for dividends?

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Published by University of Glasgow, Department of Economics. in Glasgow .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Lee S. Redding.
SeriesEconomics discussion paper series / University of Glasgow, Department of Economics -- no.9906, Economics discussion paper (University of Glasgow, Department of Economics) -- no9906.
ContributionsUniversity of Glasgow. Department of Economics.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17946429M

A flight-to-quality, or flight-to-safety, is a financial market phenomenon occurring when investors sell what they perceive to be higher-risk investments and purchase safer investments, such as gold and other precious metals. This is considered a sign of fear in the marketplace, as investors seek less risk in exchange for lower profits.. Flight-to-quality is usually accompanied by an .


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Can risk aversion explain the demands for dividends? by Lee S. Redding Download PDF EPUB FB2

(given the magnitude of the tax disadvantage) reasonable levels of risk aversion can explain the demand for dividends. The case study of Citizens Utilities provides a useful means to distinguish the present argument from other explanations for cash dividend payout.

Dividend growth stocks appeal to risk-averse investors because their predictable dividend payments help offset losses even during a downturn in the stock's price. Further, the assumption that stock prices equal expected future dividends independent of the volatility of dividends can be justified only if investor risk aversion is excluded.

If investors are risk averse, stock prices will depend on how variable dividends are as well as on their expected levels. Finance theories have long suggested a relationship between risk aversion and dividends but there is little empirical evidence on the extent of this relationship.

Redding, L.S. Can risk aversion explain the demand for dividends. Working Paper. Rozeff, M. Growth, beta and agency costs as determinants of dividend payout ratios. Journal of Financial Research, 5(3), Smith, C. Alternative methods for raising capital: Rights versus underwritten : Soo Yeon Park, Younghyo Song.

Any risk arising on chances of a government failing to make debt repayments or not honouring a loan agreement is a sovereign risk. Description: Such practices can be resorted to by a government in times of economic or political uncertainty or even to portray an assertive stance misusing its independence.

Risk Aversion This chapter looks at a basic concept behind modeling individual preferences in the face of risk.

As with any social science, we of course are fallible and susceptible to second-guessing in our theories. It is nearly impossible to model many natural human tendencies such as “playing a hunch” or “being superstitious File Size: KB.

and Zi > euros imply (respectively) risk aversion, risk neutrality, and risk loving. This characterizes attitudes toward risk qualitatively. But we can do more: within the expected utility framework, a measure of the Arrow–Pratt index of absolute risk aversion can be obtained for each consumer.

Let wi denote. Note risk aversion parameters as low as 1 can explain both the high risk premium and low risk-free returns.

Conclusions In an attemp~ to explain the equity risk premium, Mehra and Prescott () developed a frictionless, pure exchange Arrow-Debreu by:   Martín Solá (FE) Measures of Risk Aversion 08/10 2 / 41 Risk Aversion (Jensen’ Inequality) s Consider the following situation: given an initial wealth wo, there is a lottery where the possible results are h1 0 with probability (1-p).

A lottery is actuarially fair if the expected payo¤ is 0, h1 p + h2 (1-p) = 0. dividends can be justified only if investor risk aversion is excluded. If investors are risk averse, stock prices will depend on how variable dividends are as well as on their expected levels.

binations thereof) can be constructed to explain gender differences in health care utilization: (1) preferences towards health, (2) life style, (3) opportunity cost of time and (4) risk aversion.

Preferences and attitudes towards health are arguably different in women and Size: KB. This paper examines the question of whether risk aversion of prime-age workers is negatively correlated with human height to a statistically significant degree.

10 momentum, 10 size, and 10 book-to-market sorted portfolios. Our empirical work shows that compensation for consumption risk is positive and highly significant.

Our cash flow beta’s, relative to benchmark models, are far more capable of justifying the differences in risk premia in the cross-section of assets. Monte Carlo evidence presented. Based on our empirical evidence, given a small relative risk aversion (RRA) coefficient (e.g., RRA = 2), the model can well explain the equity premium puzzle, since the ambiguity aversion, as a complementary aversion of the risk aversion, can increase the equity premium and decrease the risk-free : Xinfeng Ruan, Jin E.

Zhang. Measuring risk aversion We measure risk aversion by comparing two estimates of the probability density function (PDF) for future stock prices. One estimate is extracted from option prices, while the other is estimated from realised movements in stock prices.

Risk aversion can be viewed as accounting for the difference between those two estimates. Stock Prices and Fundamentals * changes in stock-market participation patterns.

The influence of partici- pation rates, extent of diversification, background income risk, and preferences on stock prices is examined in Section 4 in an overlapping- generations model. By considering a variety of scenarios reflecting si.

risk aversion. Consumption based models can explain time varying risk aversion using a habit specification model. Campbell and Cochrane () show that when consumption is high relative to some “trend” or the recent past, investors’ risk aversion and the corresponding risk premia increase, negatively affecting risky asset prices.

The modelFile Size: KB. eBook is an electronic version of a traditional print book that can be read by using a personal computer or by using an eBook reader. (An eBook reader can be a software application for use on a computer such as Microsoft's free Reader application, or a book-sized computer that is used solely as a reading device such as Nuvomedia's Rocket eBook.

Agency theory is a principle that is used to explain and resolve issues in the relationship between business principals and their agents. Most commonly, that relationship is.

It is possible, but somehow we can benefit from loss aversion bias too. Here’s how. Winning has importance too. As we have seen earlier in the football match example, loss aversion can help a team win (if they can strategize rightly).

Loss aversion bias can also help a new investor avoid loss by becoming less greedy about earning more money. Risk aversion and opportunity cost There's a definite difference between being risk-averse and managing risk.

The reality is that the closer one gets to. Every investment carries some level of risk, and investors must establish their own measure of risk tolerance. Investors with a high level of risk tolerance are willing to put their money in industries or companies that have a higher potential for failure, and as such expect a higher rate of return on the money they invest as compensation for.

Book value approach 6. Liquidation value approach (as firm's take on more risk, investors expect and demand higher returns, dividends) The price of each share of a firm's common stock is. the value of each ownership interest. The most significant right of common stockholders is --this is risk aversion not stable over time, shifts due to.

True or false: If a stock pays dividends in the middle of the investment period, these dividends should not be accounted for when calculating HPR for this period. 7% Which of the answers below is the correct answer to the following question; Suppose the real rate of interest is 2%, and the inflation rate is 4%, so that the nominal interest rate is about 6%.

The recent growth in dividend payments may have been influenced by shareholder demands, associated with an increase in shareholder risk aversion or an increase in the demand for dividend-paying stocks at a time when traditional income-paying investments (cash and bonds) are offering very low yields.

The new insight is that the dividend and bond term structures have opposite slopes because long-term dividend claims hedge reinvestment risk while long-term bonds are exposed to such risk.

Intuitively, decreases in reinvestment rates are associated with increases in dividend present values through lower discount rates. There are three main agency problems. They are risk aversion, dividend retention and horizon disparity. Risk aversion is a problem caused by the relationship between risk and return (Drever et al, ).According to the shareholders, it is generally accepted that the higher the risk, the higher is the potential return.

A ratio of 2 or higher is considered safe—in the sense that the company can well afford the dividend—but anything below is risky. If the ratio is under 1, the company is using its retained earnings from a previous year to pay this year’s dividend, which signals the risk of instability and poor performance of the firm.

Risk preium seems to high and possible explanations are under prospect theory. Rational approches must focus on changing risk aversion to explain volatility. Volatiliy explanations under beliefs are overreaction to dividend growth, overreaction to returns, confusion between real and nominal rates.

All three of these facts are known as eqity. the structure of asset demands. For example, several recent studies have used aggregate asset demand models to determine the effects of government budget deficits or to explain the behavior of interest rates, and in each case a number was chosen for the index of risk aversion.

and dividend growth is Compared to the corresponding values for consumption growth and the sample standard deviation of stock re- turns mentioned above, these figures suggest that, for a given coefficient of relative risk aversion, dividend-based discount factors are more volatile and more correlated with the market than consumption-based ones.

when the propensity to speculate is high, investment bankers can join the chorus arguing for high valuations. By contrast, the value of a firm with a long earnings history, tangible assets, and stable dividends is much less subjective, and thus its stock is likely to be less sensitive to sentiment.

One could appeal to psychological foundations. the structure of asset demands. For example, several recent studies havE used aggregate asset demand models to determine the effects ofgovernment budget deficits or to explain the behavior of interest rates, and in each case a number was chosen for the index of risk aversion Cited by: Ambiguity Aversion and Asset Prices in Production Economies Mohammad R.

Jahan-Parvar coe cient of relative risk aversion, the model can explain several salient fea- and the evolution of dividend-price ratio in presence of demand for robustness in. The equity premium puzzle refers to the inability of an important class of economic models to explain the average premium of the returns on a well-diversified U.S.

equity portfolio over U.S. Treasury Bills observed for more than years. The term was coined by Rajnish Mehra and Edward C. Prescott in a study published in titled The Equity Premium: A Puzzle. Risk Aversion The subjective tendency of investors to avoid unnecessary risk.

It is subjective because different investors have different definitions of unnecessary. An investor seeking a large return is likely to see more risk as necessary, while one who only wants a small return would find such an investment strategy reckless.

However, most rational. Technically, the risk we should care about most is the project’s contribution to our systematic risk (see Chapter 11 "Assessing Risk"), as risk that is firm (or project) specific can be diversified away by investors.

In theory, we could try to estimate a beta. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): In this paper we study portfolios that investors hold to hedge economic risks. Using a model of state-dependent utility, we show that agents ’ economic hedging portfolios can be obtained by an intuitively appealing, risk aversion-weighted approximate replication of the economic risk variables.

Different people have different levels of risk aversion, and even the same person can exhibit different amounts, depending upon the specifics of the question. For example, many more are willing to take the gamble if the amounts of money are smaller (say $10 in option A vs.

$0 or $20 in option B), or if the wording of the questions are framed. located in counties with higher proportions of Catholics are less likely to be dividend payers and have lower dividend yields.

Firms from Protestant areas are also more likely to initiate dividends. My findings suggest a culturally induced clientele effect and they are consistent with earlier findings of different levels of risk aversion among Author: Erdem Ucar.consumer, a risk-averse consumer will choose to fully insure against a potential loss.

The only role that income can play in affecting the amount of insurance demanded at the actuarially fair price is to affect the size of the potential loss.

This result is independent of the consumer's degree of risk aversion or how it varies with income.Portfolio choice and equity characteristics: characterizing the hedging demands induced by return predictability$ has constant relative risk aversion utility with a coefficient of 4. demand induced by dividend yield as a predictor has the effect of making the.